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Calaxo® Screws PDF Print E-mail
Smith & Nephew's Calaxo® screw was utilized in the period from March 2006 to August 2007.


It was a bioabsorbable polymer and calcium carbonate device that was specifically formulated to promote bone growth and reabsorbtion into the body at a rapid rate, thus producing a quicker recovery time. 

In August 2007 Smith & Nephew announced a recall, which followed accounts of swelling, pain, pockets of fluid build up, and screw fragmentation in a number of patients.

In their recall letter, Smith & Nephew stated that, in rare cases, pre-tibial soft tissue swelling was found between 2 and 36 weeks after insertion of the Calaxo® screw.

Smith & Nephew said that “because the area of swelling and soft tissue irritation can mimic the appearance of an infection, our medical experts recommend that consideration should be given to aspirating the area for routine cultures."

It is important to note that some patients may need additional surgery involving debridement (which is the removal of dead, or infected, bone and tissue tissue); as well as the removal of remaining screw fragments.

In some cases, surgeons have further replaced the fragmented polymer screw with an alternate screw or bone graft.

During the process of reconstructive surgery, the replacement ligament - which is generally secured from  a different part of the body - is inserted into, and fixed within, tunnels that have been drilled in the shin and thigh bones using a screw device.

Metal screws were previously utilized for this form of surgical treatment; however, they remain in place unless further surgery is undertaken to remove them.

The bioabsorbable Calaxo® screw was designed to replace the older, metal screws.

Although side effects are relatively rare, they may become serious, and can include the following:

  • Swelling around the area of incision and the joint
  • Redness in the region of the incision
  • Pain at the knee joint
  • Fever

If You Have Been Injured by Calaxo® Screws

Have you or a loved one been injured by a Calaxo® screw? For a free evaluation of your potential claim, call 1-888-446-8087, or fill out an intake form on this website by clicking on "Can We Help You?" on the upper right hand corner of the home page.

Let DrugRxRecall help you win the compensation you need and deserve.

***

Do you need a Calaxo® screw lawyer?

In 2006, Smith & Nephew's Calaxo® screw gained official approval for use in the U.S.

It was utilized in surgeries until August 2007.

If you underwent an Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) surgical procedure, during which a Calaxo® screw was fitted, do not hesitate to contact us immediately, and we will be pleased to refer you to a Calaxo® screw lawyer.

The ACL goes from the shin-bone, through the joint of the knee, and up to the thigh-bone. It aids in providing stabilization to the knee.

During surgery of a reconstructive nature, the replacement ligament – which is generally obtained from a different part of the body - is inserted and fixed in holes that are drilled into the bones.
In August 2007 Smith & Nephew recalled its product following reports of swelling, pain, pockets of fluid build up, and screw fragmentation between 2 and 36 weeks after insertion of the screw. Smith & Nephew offered the following information: "...because the area of swelling and soft tissue irritation can mimic the appearance of an infection, our medical experts recommend that consideration should be given to aspirating the area for routine cultures."

Serious side-effects - that may require consultation with a Calaxo® screw lawyer - have been described in some patients that have been fitted with a Calaxo® screw, including:

  • Swelling of the joint or area of incision
  • Redness around the incision
  • Pain in the knee joint
  • Fever

Choosing Your Lawyer

If you have suffered from any or all of the side-effects referred to above after being fitted with a Calaxo® screw, you may have a claim for legal compensation that should be handled by a Calaxo® screw lawyer.

Similarly, if you have a loved one who has suffered from any of the above side-effects they may have a claim for legal compensation that should be handled by a Calaxo® screw lawyer.

DrugRxRecall Can Help You

Contact DrugRxRecall immediately for help

Helpful information about the Calaxo® Screw which has been used in ACL surgeries.

 
  • In March 2006, Smith & Nephew's Calaxo® screw was granted formal approval for use in patients in the United States, and was in use until August 2007. 
  • If you had Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) surgery, and believe a Calaxo® screw may have been used, please contact us immediately.  The ACL extends from the shin-bone, through the knee-joint, and to the thigh-bone, and assists in stabilizing the knee.
  • During the particular process of reconstructive surgery, the replacement ligament – which is usually secured from a different part of the patient's body - is inserted and fixed in tunnels that have been drilled into the bones via a screw device. 
  • In August 2007, Smith & Nephew announced they were recalling their Calaxo® screw in the wake of reports that detailed swelling, pain, fluid build-up, and screw fragmentation in a number of patients that had been fitted with the screw.
  • In rare cases, patients went on to develop pre-tibial soft tissue swelling - between 2-weeks and 9-months after the insertion of the Calaxo® screw.
  • Smith & Nephew advised health care officials and patients of the following: "because the area of swelling and soft tissue irritation can mimic the appearance of an infection, our medical experts recommend that consideration should be given to aspirating the area for routine cultures."
  • In a number of instances, additional medical procedures (including debridement, which is the removal of dead or infected bone and tissue) were needed, as was the removal of the remaining screw fragments.
  • Surgeons were also forced to replace the fragmented polymer screw with a different screw or bone graft. 

Contact Us

If you or a loved one has suffered from any of the above side-effects that have been associated with the Calaxo® screw, contact DrugRxRecall immediately.

Calaxo Screw Lawsuit

Information regarding initiating a Calaxo® Screw Lawsuit


If you or a loved one underwent an Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) procedure in which a Calaxo® screw was fitted, please contact us immediately for information on Calaxo® screw lawsuits.

Adverse side-effects (leading to lawsuits) have been reported in a number of patients fitted with the Calaxo® screw.

During such reconstructive-based surgery, the replacement ligament (which is generally obtained from another part of the body), is inserted within tunnels that are drilled into the shin bones and thigh bones using a screw device. Metal-based screws were originally used for this type of surgery, but stay permanently in place unless surgery is undertaken to have them removed. The Calaxo® screw had been created as a replacement for the metal screws.

Smith & Nephew's Calaxo® screw was granted approval for use in the U.S. in March 2006, and was utilized until August 2007, at which point Smith & Nephew recalled its product after reports surfaced of swelling, pain, pockets of fluid build up, and fragmentation of screws in a number of patients.

According to their recall letter, in some cases, patients went developed pre-tibial soft tissue swelling between 2 and 36 weeks after the insertion of the Calaxo® screw. Smith & Nephew advised that “because the area of swelling and soft tissue irritation can mimic the appearance of an infection, our medical experts recommend that consideration should be given to aspirating the area for routine cultures."

Side-effects that have been linked to the Calaxo® screw may include any of the following:

  • Swelling of the joint and/or at the area of incision
  • Redness at the area of incision
  • Knee-joint pain
  • Fever

Lawsuits and Calaxo® Injuries

If you or a loved one has experienced any of the side-effects described above that have been reported in some Calaxo® screw patients, you may have grounds for a lawsuit that should be handled by a Calaxo® screw lawyer.

DrugRxRecall Can Help You

Contact us immediately for help and assistance.

Calaxo Screw Side Effects

Information for People Who Have Suffered from Calaxo Screw Side Effects


Adverse side-effects have been reported in Smith & Nephew's Calaxo® screw.

The Calaxo® screw gained approval for usage in the U.S in March 2006. It was used in surgeries until August 2007.

If you or a loved one had an Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) surgery - in which a Calaxo® screw was inserted, and that resulted in serious side-effects - please advise DrugRxRecall of the details right now.

DrugRxRecall will be very pleased to refer you to an experienced, motivated and reliable Calaxo® screw lawyer.

In August 2007, Smith & Nephew announced a recall of the Calaxo® screw after reports surfaced that described such side-effects as swelling, pain, fluid build-up, and screw fragmentation in various patients who had been fitted with the screw.

In rare instances, patients suffered from another side-effect: pre-tibial soft tissue swelling - between 2-weeks and 9-months following the insertion of the Calaxo® screw.

As a result of these side-effects in the Calaxo® screw, Smith & Nephew informed health-care personnel and their patients of the following:

"Because the area of swelling and soft tissue irritation can mimic the appearance of an infection, our medical experts recommend that consideration should be given to aspirating the area for routine cultures."

In a few cases, surgeons had to replace the fragmented polymer screw with another screw – or, in some instances, with a bone graft to combat the side-effects.

The Side Effects Of The Calaxo® Screw Include:

  • Swelling around the area of incision and around the joint
  • Pain at the knee joint
  • Fluid build-up
  • Fever

How DrugRxRecall Can Help You With Your Calaxo® Screw Side Effects Claim

If you have suffered from any of the above side-effects after being fitted with a Calaxo® screw, you may have a claim for compensation.

Please contact us today.

 
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